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“BITCH I’M MADONNA” — In Case You Didn’t Hear It The 1st Time!

MADONNA RELEASES REMIX VIDEO FOR “BITCH I’M MADONNA” TODAY

Bitch I'm Madonna

Madonna released a remix version of “Bitch I’m Madonna” today on VEVO. The video, directed by longtime Madonna collaborator Jonas Åkerlund  (Ghosttown, Music, Ray of Light), is cut to the Sander Kleinenberg’s remix of the epic track and features both additional footage and remixed footage of the original video.

Beyoncé, Miley Cyrus, Diplo, Nicki Minaj, Katy Perry, Rita Ora, Chris Rock and Kanye West along with fashion designer Alexander Wang and Madonna’s sons Rocco and David all co-star in the video. “Bitch I’m Madonna” is the third video from Madonna’s critically acclaimed 13th studio album REBEL HEART. 

Madonna will kick off her highly anticipated Rebel Heart Tour on September 9th in Montreal, Quebec at the Bell Centre. A full list of dates can be found HERE.

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“BITCH I’M MADONNA” !!! – View Today’s Video Release Here

MADONNA is premiering the music video for “Bitch I’m Madonna” today on Tidal. The video, the third from her critically acclaimed 13th studio album REBEL HEART, is available to view exclusively by Tidal subscribers for 24 hours.  Go HERE.  Following its premiere on Tidal, the video will be available on Madonna’s VEVO page.

Featuring guest stars:  Beyoncé, Miley Cyrus, Diplo, Nicki Minaj, Katy Perry, Rita Ora, Chris Rock and Kanye West along with fashion designer Alexander Wang and Madonna’s sons Rocco and David, the “Bitch I’m Madonna” video was shot on the 17th floor at Andre Balasz’s Standard Highline hotel and in its clubs the Boom Boom Room and Le Bain. Jonas Åkerlund, who has directed several of Madonna’s videos including the already classic and current “Ghosttown”, “Music” and “Ray of Light”, directed the video.  It was styled by Arianne Phillips who is one of Madonna’s longtime stylists and was the costume designer on Madonna’s film W.E. as well as last five Madonna Tours.  A complete list of Madonna’s wardrobe can be found below.  Other credits include: Megan Lawson and Kevin Maher for choreography, Andy LeCompte for hair and makeup by Aaron Henrikson.

The Material Girl will kick off her highly anticipated Rebel Heart Tour on September 9th in Montreal, Quebec at the Bell Centre. A full list of dates can be found HERE.
Rave reviews for Rebel Heart include: ROLLING STONE:  “Rebel Heart is a long, passionate, self-referential meditation on losing love and finding purpose in chilling times.”   LA TIMES:  “Rebel Heart like its creator pushes through the pain and more often than not lands solidy and with great grace on its feet.”   NOISEY: “Madonna continues to keep us on our toes, like no other performer in the history of modern music..  NY DAILY NEWS ‘Rebel Heart’s best moments boast some of the most finely structured pop melodies of Madonna’s 32-year career.” It is available HERE.

MADONNA’S FASHION IN BITCH I’M MADONNA

MAIN LOOK

Leopard Dress: MOSCHINO
Custom Leather Jacket: DISCOUNT UNIVERSE
Threat Hat: SSUR
Whistle: CHANEL
Gloves: MAJESTY BLACK
Jewelry: LYN BAN
Shoes: GUISEPPE ZANOTTI

SECOND LOOK

Blue Silkscreen Shirt Custom Madonna / Marilyn T-shirt: TOMTOM FASHIONS
Hat: ADEEN!
Shoes: PRADA
Pink Gloves: GASPAR
Large Silver Ring: CHRIS HABANA
Rings: LYN BAN
Cuff: EDDIE BORGO

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99-Seat Review Committee releases statement in advance of Tuesday’s vote by Actors’ Equity Association national council on controversial new proposal that would eliminate availability of current 99-Seat Theater Plan in Los Angeles

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LOS ANGELES (April 20, 2015) — In the wake of a recent advisory vote by Los Angeles members of Actors’ Equity Association that will be taken under consideration when the AEA national council meets on Tuesday, April 21 to determine the fate of Los Angeles’ current 99-Seat Theater Plan, the 99-Seat Theater Review Committee has released a statement.

AEA has put forth a three-pronged proposal that would effectively eliminate availability of the current Plan, which permits its members to perform in theaters with fewer than 100 seats for a stipend, in favor of minimum wage requirements for both rehearsals and performances. 99-Seat proponents argue that the new proposal will destroy L.A.’s intimate theater scene, and have asked the union to sit down at the table with its members to work out a better plan. With a turnout of 44.6%, members voted 2,046 to 1,075 against implementing the new AEA proposal in the advisory referendum, which is not binding.

What follows is a statement from the Review Committee, which was created to monitor and study the impact, implementation, problems and operations of the 99-Seat Plan and is made up of plaintiffs, or their designates, from a 1987 lawsuit against Equity by its members.

“We are encouraged by the results of Friday’s advisory referendum. We look forward to working together with Equity to strategize, study and craft a workable 99-Seat Plan that will take into account not only where we are presently, but also where we would like to be five and ten years from now. If these past months have shown us anything, it is that Los Angeles is a vital and fervent community of artists who are united in their resolve that 99-seat theater continue to thrive.

We have sent an email to executive director, Mary McColl, assistant executive director/Western regional director Gale E. Gabler and president Nick Wyman requesting that the national council, which is scheduled to meet on Tuesday, postpone any decision regarding 99-seat theater until an in-depth study and thorough conversations with actors, community leaders and theater producers can be successfully completed.

Change is needed, and we look forward to working closely with AEA’s senior staff, the Western regional board and New York’s national council to create that blueprint.”

The members of the current Review Committee are Sean Branney, Martha Demson, John Flynn, Gary Grossman, Simon Levy, Tom Ormeny and Joe Stern.


Millennials Are a Highly Engaged Audience Willing to Spend on Arts Events

Art is definitely not dead and today Eventbrite released new insights that showcase Millennials’ unique perspective on Performing and Visual Arts events.

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Eventbrite, the global ticketing and events marketplace, today released new research that examines how millennials define, discover, spend on and engage with performing and visual arts events. Eventbrite, which experienced a 54% year-over-year increase in performing and visual arts events, surveyed more than a thousand Americans who attended an event in this category in the past 12 months. The study, “The Art of Attraction: How to Grow Your Millennial Arts Audience,” uncovers key insights including:

Millennials Attend and Spend
The millennial generation currently commands an estimated $1.3 trillion in direct annual spending and they are allocating a healthy amount of their disposable income to performing and visual arts events; one in five millennials spend $500 or more in the past year on or at performing arts or visual arts events. They also splurge on souvenirs at these events; one in three millennials said they were likely to buy merchandise, such as posters or apparel, while attending an arts event.

Numerous millennials are apt to prioritize spending on arts events over other discretionary spending. When presented with the question, if you won $1,000 and had to spend it all in the next 12 months, more millennials said they would allocate the money to arts events (50%) than coffee (35%) or alcohol (29%).

Defining and Fueling a New Performing and Visual Arts Experience

Millennials are expanding the definition of ‘arts’ and ‘arts’ events: nearly one in three (31%) feel that iPhone photography is considered a visual art, more than half (54%) consider graffiti or street art a visual art, and 43% consider comic books or graphic novels a visual art. While some speculate that millennials are less engaged with the arts, Eventbrite’s survey found millennials are often more engaged than boomers and crave a closer, more interactive look at the performing and visual arts world. Forty-three percent of millennials said they would prefer to attend events that incorporate audience participation, while only 29% of boomers feel the same way.

Some millennials take this engagement even further and set out to acquire new skills following arts events. Millennials are more than five times as likely as their boomer counterparts (21% vs. 4%) to take a class related to the arts after attending an event, such as enrolling in dance lessons after visiting the ballet.

Focus on Digital Discovery and Crowdsourced Recommendation
Millennials are more likely than boomers to hear about arts events through online resources like social media (48% vs. 24%), online ads (28% vs. 19%), and blogs (25% vs. 4%). In contrast, boomers are more likely than millennials to learn about arts events through traditional channels, including TV (66% vs. 42%), print (63% vs. 33%) and radio (49% vs. 33%) ads.

When it comes to taking action from reviews, everyone’s a critic in millennials’ eyes: they are almost equally as likely to attend an arts event because it was recommended on a site such as Yelp (47%) as they would if it was recommended by a critic or reviewer (53%). Boomers are more influenced by critics, with 73% likely to attend arts events if they recommend it and only 27% likely to attend based on a recommendation from a review site.

A Millennial Rendition of Arts Events
In 2014, Eventbrite saw a more than 60% growth in performing and visual arts events where alcohol is served, a trend in line with survey findings that more than half (58%) of millennials prefer arts events with drinks on the menu. Additionally, two in three millennials (66%) prefer arts events with food, and 31% said they would attend more arts events if they could eat or drink during a performing or visual arts event.

Millennials embrace the tradition and formality around arts events; survey results found that they enjoy dressing up and attending fancier gatherings. Thirty-five percent of millennials would rather attend an arts event that is formal instead of casual (vs. 14% of boomers). Nearly half of millennials (49%) even think performing and visual arts events are not dressy enough. Even though formality can be a draw for millennials at arts events, they don’t want to be forced into a tux. Sixty-three percent would prefer events without the rules of a dress code, proving a little freedom can go a long way with this generation.

“Amid recent studies indicating a decline in arts event attendance rates for U.S. adults, it was encouraging to see that our study found 70% of millennials who recently attended an arts event expressed interest in attending more,” said Martina Wang, marketing lead at Eventbrite. “The challenge for performing and visual arts organizations is to effectively reach this highly-connected, influential generation, while staying true to deep-rooted traditions. Our findings offer them valuable insights into the future of this industry.”

For more details and to view the full study, please visit the Event Academy, Eventbrite’s resource for event organizers with webinars, whitepapers, and industry insights for events of any kind. To learn more about Eventbrite ticketing and registration for performing and visual arts events, check out eventbrite.com/arts.

About Eventbrite
Eventbrite is the global marketplace for live experiences that allows people to find and create events. Since 2006, the self-service platform has helped event organizers of all kinds to sell more tickets through robust technology and promotional tools, totaling $3.5 billion in gross ticket sales. In addition to providing technology for organizers, Eventbrite has become the destination for consumers looking to discover a variety of live experiences from small photography and yoga classes to large concerts and festivals with tens of thousands of attendees. More than 200 million tickets have been processed on the platform, and in 2014 alone, Eventbrite processed $1.5 billion in gross ticket sales for attendees in more than 180 countries. Eventbrite investors include Sequoia Capital, Tiger Global and T. Rowe Price. Learn more at www.eventbrite.com.

 


What’s In A Name?

I was told by another writer who analyzed one of my websites that I should completely throw out my name.  Get rid of it altogether so that it would be more appealing to sell my work for profit as a writer myself.

But what if that name is already a brand?  And what if that brand is already a public identity that not just readers recognize, but other influencers who are tying to make a connection: publicity and marketing specialists, merchants and artists in the arts & culture sphere, hoping I’ll hear what they have to say and write about them?

I never actually thought of my blog as a tool for sales.  That was never the point.  It was designed as a platform through which I could parlay my former celebrity and notoriety with other reinventions of my entertainment career and create a place where others could launch themselves.  That may sound very altruistic, but opening up the door for other artists in the ways I had needed, wanted and sometimes got, over the years, was, I thought. necessary.  I needed a champion.  I could now be one.

This was the first time I’d ever heard this advice from anyone including other professionals. But instead of it being a shock, I focused.  I asked myself, “what’s important to me and what’s important to others about what I do?”

Through the advice of  a friend, colleague and brilliant business strategist, I realized I needed a new direction, a larger goal, some minor tweeks for a dynamic change.  And yes, I could make money, keeping my integrity and my name intact.

I guess you could say that it wasn’t the name, it was the meaning.  I now have a better plan.

 


I guess I should never say never again…

Been secretly dancing Tango again, mostly for variety, with a long time friend and fellow professional performer who was a competitive ballroom dancer for many years.  After too long a time of being a part of the LA Tango scene, I just got sick of not having fun — the drama, worse, the melodrama, the dateless and desperate social situations and mostly the egos of nearly everyone else who was trying to make themselves a celebrity out of it.

Don’t get me wrong, I made some wonderful friends, two of whom died in the last couple of years.  That was hard.  And at one point I kind of realized that I didn’t enjoy being treated badly, impolitely and having to spend money for that.  I called it quits.  I loved the dance, but not much more.

Today I kind of agreed to go dancing again for the first time in maybe 3 years.  My friend has a bad shoulder injury and doesn’t want to dance with most of the women who hang on him.  My rule is that I will never walk into a room alone.

When we danced for the first time as close embrace partners (we had danced  choreography together before in performance but it was always stylized court dancing from other centuries) we realized, although he had so much more experience than me, that we were actually a good fit.

Out to a local hot spot for one hour only is the plan.  I’m wondering if we’ll both go through with it.


I LOVE DANCE!